What is Mānuka Honey, and why is it good for you?

Mānuka honey is Components of Manuka Honey

Hydrogen peroxide gives most honey its antibiotic quality. But some types, including manuka honey, also have other ingredients with antibacterial qualities.

The major antibacterial component in manuka honey is methylglyoxal (MG). MG is a compound found in most types of honey, but usually only in small quantities.

In manuka honey, MG comes from the conversion of another compound, dihydroxyacetone, that is found in high concentration in the nectar of manuka flowers.

The higher the concentration of MG, the stronger the antibiotic effect.

Honey producers have a scale for rating the potency of manuka honey. The rating is called UMF, which stands for Unique Manuka Factor.

The UMF rating reflects the concentration of MG. To be considered potent enough to be therapeutic, manuka honey needs a minimum rating of 10 UMF. Honey at or above that level is marketed as "UMF Manuka Honey" or "Active Manuka Honey." But doctors and researchers aren’t sure if this rating means anything from a medical standpoint.

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Manuka honey is a type of honey native to New Zealand.

It’s produced by bees who pollinate the flower Leptospermum scoparium, commonly known as the manuka bush.

Manuka honey’s antibacterial properties are what set it apart from traditional honey.

Methylglyoxal is its active ingredient and likely responsible for these antibacterial effects.

Additionally, manuka honey has antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits.

In fact, it has traditionally been used for wound healing, soothing sore throats, preventing tooth decay and improving digestive issues.

Here are 7 science-based health benefits of manuka honey.